There From Here

Start Here…Get There

  • Follow Me on Twitter

  • Recent Comments

    WeAreAvant on Getting There: Tavaghn “…
    Avant on Guest Post: Part II Strengthen…
    Yasmin (Arrows With… on Getting There: Howard Jean Spe…
    Getting There: Tavag… on Getting There: Tavaghn “…
    Julie on Guest Post: Hey, Gen Y, Are Yo…
  • August 2009
    S M T W T F S
    « Jul   Sep »
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • RSS My Blog

    • There From Here Has Moved!
      Until I can get a re-direct working, please note that I have moved to my own domain at http://www.officialtherefromhere.com/blog Advertisements Filed under: RandomThoughtOftheDay
    • #GenYChat with Josip Petrusa
      On Wednesday June 9, 2010 #GenYChat will have a guest moderator: Josip Petrusa! To participate in the discussion, click this link. http://tweetchat.com/room/genychat We will be discussing the GenY Catch 22: Getting experience without having experience and dealing with the consequences. For transcripts from previous chats, please click hereFiled under: Random […]
    • RTOD: Domain Name Pain
      I‘ve been going back and forth with myself for a little while now regarding the purchase of a domain name. I started this blog a year ago to give myself the opportunity to finally get serious about what I wanted to do with my life. I feel that I’ve done a consistent job with this […]
    • Gen Y: How Do You Handle Promotions?
      The situation: You have experience at a certain level of authority within a company. You are being offered a promotion by a different company that is in the same industry but has different products. The question: If you’ve never worked with the products, how do you convince yourself, and, thus, the company offering the promotion, […]
    • Guest Post: Hey, Gen Y, Are You Afraid To Network?
      I’m a Gen Y job seeker. Unemployment data tells me I’m not the only one. A recent Pew study shows that 37% of 18-29 year olds are out of work! But the career and networking events I go to tell a different story. Networking, networking, networking. We’ve all heard endless times how it’s the best […]
    • Getting There: Howard Jean Speaks Part II
      Getting There is a series featuring interviews from Generation Y young people who are breaking stereotypes and not only working hard to achieve their own definition of success but working to improve the lives of others around them. Mr. Howard Jean, Director of the Call Me MISTER (CMM) Program, works to improve the lives of […]
    • Getting There: Howard Jean Speaks Part I
      Getting There is a series featuring interviews from Generation Y young people who are breaking stereotypes and not only working hard to achieve their own definition of success but working to improve the lives of others around them. Mr. Howard Jean, Director of the Call Me MISTER (CMM) Program, works to improve the lives of […]
    • Getting There: Tavaghn “Montsterr” Monts Speaks Part II
      Getting There is a series featuring interviews from Generation Y young people who are breaking stereotypes and not only working hard to achieve their own definition of success but working to improve the lives of others around them. Among other professions Tavaghn “Montster” Monts is Vice President of My Life Keys where he works as a Motivator […]
    • Getting There: Tavaghn “Montsterr” Monts Speaks Part I
      Getting There is a series featuring interviews from Generation Y young people who are breaking stereotypes and not only working hard to achieve their own definition of success but working to improve the lives of others around them. Among other professions Tavaghn “Montster” Monts is Vice President of My Life Keys where he works as […]
    • Talking About My Generation Y
      Generation Y gets talked about quite frequently. We’re lazy, unmotivated, listless, unproductive, blah blah blah. Frankly, I’m none of these things. I know many more GenY’ers who don’t fit this stereotype, either. Hiring managers, why are you consistently hiring the same type of GenY young person if business claim to despise having them in their […] […]
  • Previous Entries

RTOD – Racial Profiling

Posted by Chanelle Schneider on August 1, 2009

When will it end? In 1990 The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air tackled the issue of racial profiling in the episode entitled “Mistaken Identity”. This episode is, sadly, still relevant today in light of the recent case with Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Especially relevant is the difference between the reactions of Carlton and Will who are from differing spheres of influence regarding class, which impacts their own view of race relations.

Here are the first two parts if you would like more background on the episode.

In an episode of Family Matters Eddie Winslow is upset because he believes he was profiled. His father, a police officer, approaches the cops who stopped his son. One officer in particular is clearly agitated at being accused and says, “Come on. Give me a break. It’s dark. It’s a black guy.”

The relevant portion begins at 5:00.

Here are the other parts if you would like more background on the episode.

Add to: Facebook | Digg | Del.icio.us | Stumbleupon | Reddit | Blinklist | Twitter | Technorati | Furl | Newsvine

Advertisements

10 Responses to “RTOD – Racial Profiling”

  1. This will be a neverending cycle. I’ve seen all of those episodes, and I think the one that baffled me the most was the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, where Carlton and Will were put in jail for supposedly stealing a car. First off, the proper procedures were not taken, that’s why it became a racial thing. They were under 18, therefore parents should have been contacted immediately. Policemen allowed them to make a call, however, the police should have made it a priority to get in touch with the parents if it was such a concern.

    This was very similar to the Henry Louis Gates, Jr. instead a phone call was made that he was breaking into a house that was really his. Never did Philip’s colleague say that his car was stolen.
    And that was almost 20 years ago when that aired. So tell me, do you think it will ever end? If racism still exists, so does racial profiling. I totally agree with you.

    • When I was a child watching these episodes, I remember being affected by these story lines because they were not a part of my experience. I was naive enough to believe that because this was happening on television, that it would cease to be a part of reality. What I know, now, as television becomes increasingly unreal with the proliferation of these reality shows, is that this sitcom was exploring topics with the proper blend of hilarity and sentiment to achieve its goal of increasing awareness of a serious issue. I wish television would return to the era where we could learn something about how to better humanity from their scripts. Everyone expected a teachable moment to come out of the Beer Summit with Obama, Crowley and Gates. It’s a shame that television offered the teachable moment 19 years ago, and we still haven’t learned anything.

  2. Kevin L said

    For me, the worse thing about racial profiling that I experienced was how it made me feel after the fact. I was pulled over and questioned for about 10-15 minutes and cop never once told me why I was pulled over. My suv wsa properly registered, had insurance and no outstanding tickets. He ran my plates and license anyway and asked me where ws my partner. I was driving by myself and told him I had no clue what he was talking about. After everything came back clear, he said I was free to go. No explanation, no apology.

    I tried to give him the benefit of doubt and think that my vehicle may have resembled another that was involved in a crime. But when he drove off without any type of explanation, I just felt angry and humiliated.

    • Oh wow. That must have been horrible to go through. I can’t imagine how upset you must have been. Your story is very similar to the situation on the Family Matters episode. It’s amazing how power can cause people to become corrupt.

  3. I’ll never forget that episode of Fresh Prince. I was so mad with Carlton, like really how naive and blind are you? No matter where you live, how much money you have, where you go to school, what number of degrees you have, you are still a black person and in most cases that’s all people see, especially police. On the way to a baby shower one year in Westminster, MD my best friend was stopped by the police, removed from her car, handcuffed, and forced to wait there on the sidestreet in a residential area while the officer called for backup…. 3 extra police cars!!! She’s there crying asking them why they are doing this to her and dude’s excuse was that there had been “an increase in suspicious activities in the area” translation? “there’s been more of you n***ers around here than usual. Bastards!

  4. Massachusetts said

    But the Professor Gates incident was NOT like a TV show. He should have known anyone breaking into a house might be reported. I would have called the police myself and said, “Someone is breaking into Professor Gates’ house!” The caller DID NOT know his race!

    Racial discrimination occurs if the officer won’t look at your automobile registration and licence to determine you are legally driving the car. It’s an instance of racial profiling if the person is handcuffed BEFORE the officer is willing to look at the ID with address and see it is his OWN HOUSE and breaking into it is not a crime.

    There are instances of racial profiling, sadly, but the Professor Gates incident was not one of them. The arresting officer got angry because Professor Gates became angry and slapped on handcuffs which was wrong. But he initially treated Professor Gates as he would any other suspect. The African-American officer with him also behaved properly in the possible housebreaking. Officer Crowley was asked to teach how to avoid racial profiling at the police academy! The inaccurate assumptions about racial discrimination in this case take attention away from actual cases of racial profiling and inappropriate treatment of suspects if they are persons of color.

  5. louisiana said

    I agree with Massachusetts on this one. He should have shown his I’d, bottom line! The police were doing their job, period. This was not racial profiling, had he been an actual intruder and the police taken on a “carry on-no wait! Let’s get you a locksmith!” Attitude, things could have just as easily taken a bad turn. I also agree that President Obama should have offered his apology for saying these patrol officers were stupid.

    Having said that, I totally agree that there are still police officers (of all races) who profile. I am a white woman, and have been stopped in a black neighborhood and told that it was “too late” for me to be there. Can you imagine? What? Was it too late for me to be buying drugs? Or dropping off my “secret black boyfriend”? It sickens me that it never occurred to them that I could have been sitting on the couch of my BEST FRIEND, watching movies, cooking, talking, and generally MINDING MY OWN BUSINESS! –ignorance, sadly, strips us ALL of our freedoms, on a daily basis. It is now a two way street. I’m treated disrespectfully frequently by black people just for being white. I’m not sure if its because they feel all white people are racist or what, but sorry! I’m not that person! This is often referred to as “reverse racism”. There is no such thing! Its racism, plain and simple. Calling it “reversed” only implies that one or the other are okay, and they’re not. But I am happy with my life and the people in it, I have been fortunate enough to be blessed with wonderful people, from all backgrounds who influence my life on a daily basis. I am saddened by what happens in this world due to ignorance of minds- however I do my best to continue forward unaffected, because God knew what he was doing by putting us here in an assortment of colors, sizes, temperments-and it was not so we would know where we belong, I believe it was to teach acceptance. And there are plenty people who can benefit from this lesson.

  6. louisiana said

    Correction: Gates should have shown his I’d when asked, the first time. Instead he chose to cut up and cry racism. This man is a leader, an educator- but I suppose he could be promoting his business. Dentists probably sell candy on the side too.
    But seriously Chanelle, this is my opinion of Gates, based on all that I have read about the situation (and I’ve read everything I could find). But racial profiling, however, does still exist and sadly always will until we all instill in our children to think with a loving and accepting mind. To realize that our differences are so minute but that several years ago people were so greedy to get “civilization” started in America that it was a dang free-for-all and several thousands of God’s children were severely mistreated, and that wrong can never be made right! There is NOTHING that can be done to rectify all the lives that were ruined. But not one of those people are on earth today (victims nor perpetrators) yet the legacy remains today. THAT can be changed, but how? I believe that we are here to love one another, but not everyone agrees. I believe that God won’t intervene due to the fact he gave us free will, however there is no doubt in my mind that he does cry for and with his children.

    While I love a good argument- I believe it is healthy and stimulating, I am exhausted at this point and must go to bed, but let the record reflect that your blog is awesome, and I will be returning. Keep up the great work. People NEED to be talking about these things. And btw, I’m loving your moretolove series- I anxiously await the next part…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: